On the Firmness of the Wise Man (Annotated) by Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Aubrey Stewart

By Lucius Annaeus Seneca, Aubrey Stewart

I'd really say, Serenus, that there's as broad a distinction among the Stoics and the opposite sects of philosophers as there's among women and men, when you consider that every one classification contributes an equivalent proportion to human society, however the one is born to command, the opposite to obey. the opposite philosophers care for us lightly and coaxingly, simply as our accustomed kin physicians frequently do with bodies, treating them no longer by way of the simplest and shortest technique, yet via that which we let them hire; while the Stoics undertake a manly direction, and don't care approximately its showing appealing to those that are coming into upon it, yet that it may as fast as attainable take us out of the realm, and lead us to that lofty eminence that is up to now past the scope of any missile weapon that it truly is above the succeed in of Fortune herself. "But the way in which through which we're requested to climb is steep and uneven." What then? Can heights be reached via a degree course? but they aren't so sheer and precipitous as a few imagine. it's only the 1st half that has rocks and cliffs and no obvious outlet, simply as many hills noticeable from some distance off look all of sudden steep and joined jointly, as the distance deceives our sight, after which, as we draw closer, these very hills which our fallacious eyes had made into one steadily spread themselves, these elements which appeared precipitous from afar think a carefully sloping define. while simply now point out was once made up of Marcus Cato, you whose brain revolts at injustice have been angry at Cato’s personal age having so little understood him, at its having distributed a spot under Vatinius to at least one who towered above either Caesar and Pompeius; it appeared shameful to you, that after he spoke opposed to a few legislations within the discussion board his toga used to be torn from him, and that he used to be hustled in the course of the fingers of a mutinous mob from the Rostra so far as the arch of Fabius, enduring the entire undesirable language, spitting, and different insults of the frantic rabble.

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On the Firmness of the Wise Man (Annotated)

I would really say, Serenus, that there's as huge a distinction among the Stoics and the opposite sects of philosophers as there's among women and men, considering that each one classification contributes an equivalent proportion to human society, however the one is born to command, the opposite to obey. the opposite philosophers care for us lightly and coaxingly, simply as our accustomed relatives physicians frequently do with bodies, treating them no longer by way of the easiest and shortest procedure, yet by means of that which we let them hire; while the Stoics undertake a manly direction, and don't care approximately its showing appealing to those that are getting into upon it, yet that it's going to as quick as attainable take us out of the area, and lead us to that lofty eminence that's to this point past the scope of any missile weapon that it really is above the achieve of Fortune herself.

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The Latin word ‘‘contumelia’’ is derived from the word contempt, because no one does that injury to another unless he regards him with contempt; and no one can treat his elders and betters with contempt, even though he does what contemptuous persons are wont to do; for children strike their parents' faces, infants rumple and tear their mother's hair, and spit upon her and expose what should be covered before her, and do not shrink from using dirty language; yet we do not call any of these things contemptuous.

It would be endless were I to mention all the insults which he heaped upon his parents and ancestors, and people of every class of life. I will mention those which brought him to ruin. An especial friend of his was Asiaticus Valerius, a proud-spirited man and one hardly likely to put up with another's insults quietly. At a drinking bout, that is, a public assembly, Gaius, at the top of his voice, reproached this man with the way his wife behaved in bed. Good gods! that a man should hear that the emperor knew this, and that he, the emperor, should describe his adultery and his disappointment to the lady's husband, I do not say to a man of consular rank and his own friend.

Return [2] Scipio. Return [3] The Stoics. Return [4] Seneca here speaks of men wearing the toga as officials, contrasted with the mass of Roman citizens, among whom the wearing of the toga was already falling into disuse in the time of Augustus. See Macrob. ," vi. ,' i. 282, to the Romans of his day. Return [5] See note, "De Beneficiis," vi. 33. ” Return Seneca the Younger (BIOGRAPHY) Lucius Annaeus Seneca (often known simply as Seneca; ca. 4 BC — AD 65) was a Roman Stoic philosopher, statesman, dramatist, and in one work humorist, of the Silver Age of Latin literature.

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